AUDITIONS

THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE AUDITIONS

June 22nd, 2019

Auditions for Thoroughly Modern Millie will be held, by appointment only, June 22nd, 2019 at Hale Studios (537 N. 1200 W. in Orem).

Audition appointments may be made by calling the box office at 801-226-8600. Arrive 15 minutes prior to your scheduled appointment to fill out the appropriate paperwork before your audition time.

Please prepare 16 bars of a song in the style of the show. An accompanist will be provided. Headshots and resumes are encouraged. Bring sheet your sheet music. No minus tracks may be used.

Thoroughly Modern Millie will be directed by Lisa Hall, with choreography by Ashley Gardner Carlson, and music direction by Justin Bills.

Callbacks, by invitation only, will be on Saturday, June 29th, 2019.

Anyone who is unable to attend the initial audition may submit an audition form and video. Please send your video along with a headshot, resume, and your audition form to meagan@haletheater.org no later than June 20th to be considered for callbacks. You may download the audition form HERE

Character Descriptions

Note: All ethnicities, races, and body types will be considered for all roles except where specifically noted for character.


Female Roles

JMILLIE DILLMOUNT:

JA spunky, modern woman trying to make it in New York City, who falls in love with Jimmy. Our story's protagonist. Gender: Female. Age: 20s. Vocal range top: E5 Vocal range bottom: G#3.

MISS DOROTHY BROWN:

A naive, wealthy girl who has moved to New York to change her lifestyle. She becomes Millie's roommate and confidant. Gender: Female. Age: 20s. Vocal range top: C6 Vocal range bottom: B3.

MISS FLANNERY:

An uptight, stern office manager. She runs the stenographer pool at Sincere Trust Insurance Company. Gender: Female. Age: 30s/40s. Vocal range top: D5 Vocal range bottom: Bb3.

MUZZY VAN HOSSMERE:

A glamorous actress and singer at a night club. She becomes Millie's friend and mentor. She is confident, wise and spunky.
Note: Honoring original casting, preference will be given to actresses of color. Gender: Female. Age: 30s/40s. Vocal range top: D5 Vocal range bottom: G#3.

FEMALE ENSEMBLE:

~7 performers who each play a Hotel Priscilla Girl: Ruth, Gloria, Rita, Alice, Cora, Lucille, Ethel Peas. They also cover all other roles, including dancers at the Speakeasy, guests at Muzzy’s party, Stenographers in the typing pool at “Sincere Trust,” Moderns (citizens of New York), and others. Demanding, flexible tracks that require dynamic and engaging performers.


Male Roles

JIMMY SMITH:

A suave city slicker who unexpectedly becomes the story's hero. He falls in love with Millie. Gender: Male. Age: 20s/30s. Vocal range top: A4 Vocal range bottom: C3.

TREVOR GRAYDON

An executive at the Sincere Trust Insurance Company. He is sharp, ambitious, and secretly romantic. Gender: Male. Age: 30s/40s. Vocal range top: G4 Vocal range bottom: A2.

MALE ENSEMBLE:

4-7 performers who cover all other roles, including dancers at the Speakeasy, guests at Muzzy’s party, and others. Demanding, flexible tracks that require dynamic and engaging performers.


Please see additional notes concerning the following roles:

MRS. MEERS*

A former actor/actress turned human trafficker pretending to be a kindly matron who oversees the Hotel Priscilla, but secretly sells her tenants. Gender: Any. Age: 30s-50s. Vocal range top: Bb4 Vocal range bottom: E3.

CHING HO*:

A Chinese immigrant working to bring their mother to the United States. Younger brother of Bun Foo and henchman to Mrs. Meers. Sings and speaks in Chinese. Gender: Male. Age: 20s. Vocal range top: E4 Vocal range bottom: Bb2.

BUN FOO*:

A Chinese immigrant working to bring their mother to the United States. Older sibling of Ching Ho and henchman to Mrs. Meers. Sings and speaks in chinese. Gender: Any. Age: 20s. Vocal range top: E4 Vocal range bottom: E3.


*Note: In the spirit of the letter from the play’s author, reprinted below, there is flexibility in the casting of these characters. The role of Mrs. Meers will be open to both men and women, and will likely be played as a person simply in disguise, rather than someone specifically in disguise as a Chinese woman.

The character of Mrs. Meers -- a failed actor-turned-criminal-- is intended to behave in a manner consistent with an ignorant person's idea of how a Chinese woman would behave (i.e., her portrayal of a Chinese woman is based on her own stereotyping). On the other hand, there are two genuine Chinese characters in the show-- Bun Foo and Ching Ho-- and other than the fact that they speak in their native tongue (i.e., Chinese dialects) they are no different than any of the other characters in the show--human, earnest and multi-dimensional. Specifically, I want to clarify that from the authors’ perspective, there is only one stereotype: Mrs. Meers. She is a Caucasian woman using her “acting skills” to impersonate a Chinese woman in an effort to avoid police detection, and does it in a highly offensive way. If you feel you must stay away from that approach, in terms of narrative, all that is required is that Mrs. Meers be a failed actor who is using acting techniques to shield criminal activity. It does not have to be a “Chinese” act she’s doing. The easiest and boldest way to solve this: cast a man as “Mrs. Meers.” When he’s “Mrs. Meers,” he’s wearing a wig and fully trying to pass as a woman; when he’s alone with Bun Foo and Ching Ho, the wig comes off and he’s “David Crumpler,” failed actor-turned-criminal. There need be nothing Chinese about his disguise; he can disguise himself as any woman he wishes. Stereotype problem solved; story still told. You may also, of course, cast an actress, and direct her to differentiate between “Mrs. Meers” and “Daisy Crumpler,” e.g. “Mrs. Meers” is a flighty, fluttery, aging Southern belle, and “Daisy Crumpler” is a tough-as-nails, Brooklyn born-and-raised villain, or some such contrast. Again, this avoids any reference to anything Chinese in regards to this character’s arc. As for Bun Foo and Ching Ho, they are not stereotypes, they are people. Characters. That is why they speak and sing in Cantonese and Mandarin, respectively. I think the script states clearly -- and if it doesn’t, I’m stating it clearly here -- that in no way are their performances to be exaggerated, -2- lampooned, made fun of, nada. The actors should approach their roles no differently than the actress playing Millie approaches hers: with truth, integrity, imagination and intentionality. The Chinese should be rendered as authentically as possible. They should not be in “coolie” costumes. When they speak in English, e.g. “I love you, Miss Dorothy,” l’s do not become r’s; listen to the cast recording for confirmation of that. They don’t speak English, but they shouldn’t speak English: they’ve been in America for a few weeks. Make them as dimensional and differentiated from each other (they are as different from each other as Millie and Miss Dorothy are), and not only will you NOT be presenting stereotypes, you will be BUSTING stereotypes. I know this for a fact because I’ve seen it happen on Broadway, on Tour, in London, and in many, many productions I’ve seen since then.

Thank you, and best of luck with your production.

Warm regards,

Dick Scanlan

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